PHOTO GALLERY: Sledding

Lauren Brant/Star-Herald Nathalia and Nathan Rivera of Scottsbluff enjoy the fresh snow as they sled down a hill in Gering Tuesday, Nov. 26. Nathalia said she enjoyed the afternoon with her son because he loves playing in the snow.

Despite the 20 degree temperatures Tuesday, Nov. 26, people grabbed their sleds and snowboards and headed to Suicide Hill in Gering for an afternoon of winter fun.

Families enjoyed some bonding time with their children outside and friends warmed up by laughing as they slid through the snow.

For Paul Goss of Gering, it was fun to watch his daughters Eliana and Abigail sled and snowboard.

“I like to see them enjoying the outside like I do, in any kind of weather,” Goss said.

Goss started snowboarding from a young age and he wanted to pass that skill onto his children. Last year, they picked up a snowboard at Goodwill for $10. Since then, Abigail has hit the hills around Gering working on her skills.

“It’s easy to go down,” she said. “I was excited when it started snowing.”

Aside from snowboarding, Abigail said, “I like to make snow angels and snowmen in the snow. I haven’t had a chance to do that, yet.”

Meredith Zlomke and Brenden Trautman also enjoyed the snow Tuesday afternoon, turning their sledding into a race. As they found their lanes, Zlomke said the type of sled impacts the run.

“It depends on the sled and having your feet down can help you turn or slow you down,” she said.

While the two have raced for a couple years, Trautman said it’s a tie with who wins.

Zlomke said she and the rest of her classmates were surprised when school was canceled Monday, but she was excited because she would be able to play in the snow.

“It was a good surprise at the end of the day,” she said.

Breanna Russel and Danielle Jay, both of Minatare, traveled to Suicide Hill Tuesday for an exhilarating afternoon. Jay thought it would be fun to go sledding and invited Russel along.

“What I enjoy about sledding is having my friend push me down a cliff,” Russel said. “Then I scream. It’s exhilarating and gets me closer to hang out with my friends I don’t always get to see them over break.”

The two friends spent most of their time going down Suicide Hill and spinning out into the fresh powder at the bottom and sides of the run.

“We thought it would be more fun to go down this because we say the other one is for wimps,” Russel said.

As the temperatures slowly climbed into the 30s, more people arrived at the hill. Ryland Ray, Jacobe Elliott and Deakin Tuttle decided to create a train out of their sleds. After multiple attempts down the big hill resulting in the boys splitting apart halfway down, they decided to try it on the hill.

Getting some momentum behind them, Ray became nervous as the train spun around sideways, bringing him to the front of the line.

“I thought we were going straight into that tree,” he said.

Again, the train fell apart and they rolled down the hill laughing.

Nathalia Rivera and her son Nathan of Scottsbluff also shared laughs.

“I like getting him out in the snow because it’s less screen time and he just loves the snow,” Rivera said.

Kathleen Ruiz and her daughter Amanda, 4, also went down the hill in Gering.

“I enjoy spending time with her,” Ruiz said. “This is our first time sledding. It was fun and scary.”

We're always interested in hearing about news in our community. Let us know what's going on!

Lauren Brant is a reporter with the Star-Herald and the Gering Courier. Contact her at 308-632-9043 or by email at lauren.brant@starherald.com.

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