All year round, former Husker and NFL veteran Adam Carriker is taking the pulse of Husker Nation. In the "Carriker Chronicles" video series, he breaks down the latest NU news, upcoming opponents, player updates and recruiting information, and he offers his insight into the X's and O's and more.

On Friday's episode, Adam Carriker evaluates Nebraska's running back group and discusses potential contributors for the 2020 season.

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Check out a full transcript below:

Welcome to another Fast Friday edition the Carriker Chronicles, where each and every Friday we keep it quick, brought to you by Nebraska Spine Hospital.

At least I hope I keep it quick today because I'm going to break down the Huskers' running back room. I'm going to start with the guys that are currently on the roster.

Dedrick Mills 5-foot-11, 220 pounds. He's a senior that came on late last year. He was honorable mention all-Big Ten, and he averaged 5.2 yards per rush a season ago. He led Nebraska in rushing, just like he led Georgia Tech in rushing all the way back when he was a freshman with the Yellow Jackets. He needs to be the Huskers' main guy this year because he has that experience, that talent, that ability. We need to find someone to compliment him though. He needs to take the ball literally, or the bull literally by the horns, not so literally. I don't know. He needs to take the bull by the horns and we need to find someone to step up with him.

Let's look at Rahmir Johnson, 5-10, 180 pounds, redshirt freshman. He was a track star in high school ladies and gentlemen. He ran a 10.5 100-meter dash. It kind of reminds me of the old Wile E. Coyote cartoons where he's chasing the Roadrunner and the Roadrunner had like fire on the road behind him as he ran, that's kind of what that reminds me of. He's got some great speed. He played in four games last year, showed great flashes of his ability vs. Maryland late in the season. Keep your eye on Rahmir.

Ronald Thompkins, 5-11, 195 pounds, a little bit forgotten about, redshirt freshman but that's because he's been recovering from an injury that he suffered in high school. Prior to that injury, he was one of the top running backs in the country. He had offers from Alabama, Auburn, Florida, Florida State, Oregon, Penn State and USC. He's a little bit under the radar because of that injury and a potential dark horse to keep your eye on.

Marvin Scott, let's look at the guys that are coming in. Well, let's look at a guy that just left, Jalen Bradley, I wish him all the best. He is going to the transfer portal. We currently also have another potential running back in Wan'Dale Robinson, but we need to have him out at wide receiver. We need Omar Manning, we need Wan'Dale Robinson, we need JD Spielman. We need some running backs to step up. We need to find a quarterback. He needs to be a receiver because that allows us to get more playmakers on the field at once talking about Mr. Wan'Dale Robinson.

Now let's look at the guys who will be arriving on campus soon. Marvin Scott, 5-9, 200 pounds, from Port Orange, Florida. He's gonna be a freshman, a five-year varsity player in high school. He made the varsity team is an eighth grader. I didn't even know that could happen, kind of cool. Anyway, so his stats are pretty crazy because he's got that extra year on the varsity, he made varsity in the eighth grade as I mentioned. He ran for 7,482 yards in high school and scored 80 total touchdowns. Again that's impressive, especially that he made the varsity as an eighth grader, also a state champion weightlifter. Scott claimed the top spot 199-pound weightlifting division with a total of 700 pounds and the bench press and clean and jerk combined. His bench press was 405, which by the way I didn't do until I was like a junior in college, and a 295 pound clean and jerk.

You look also at incoming freshmen Sevion Morrison at 6-0, 200 pounds out of Tulsa, Oklahoma. He rushed over 5,000 yards and he just played the normal four years of high school. In his senior year he rushed for almost 2,000 yards and averaged almost 10 yards per carry, which actually isn't great compared to his junior year where he rushed for 2,728 yards and lead Oklahoma in rushing, had almost 40 touchdowns and averaged almost 13 yards per carry.

They've got some talent on the roster now. They've got experience in Dedrick. They've got accomplished guys for sure coming in. We need people to step up and let's not forget the walk-ons. Hey, we want the walk-on program to come back. Let's show these guys some love as well: Cooper Jewett walk-on from Omaha, redshirt freshman. Zach Weinmaster, 5-11, 190 pounds, redshirt freshman from Loveland, Colorado. Connor Ruth, 5-11, 215 pounds, sophomore from Seward. Corbin Ruth, 6-0, 220 pounds, junior from Malcolm.

All right, let's get some guys to step up. We need to be physical, we need to pick up the blitz, and third down protection, we need some routes being run by these running backs looking like wide receivers, catching the ball like wide receivers, we need some playmakers to step up.

All right, I don't think this is as quick as a normal Fast Friday, but hopefully it was worth it. Go Big Red, and always remember to throw the bones!

Thanks again to the Nebraska Spine Hospital. Ladies and gentlemen, when it’s your spine, you do not want to mess around. Experience matters. That’s why you can trust the experts at Nebraska Spine Hospital, the region's only spine specific hospital. They are the best at what they do.

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