US Olympic boxer cleared of doping violation caused by sex

FILE - In this Aug. 2, 2019, file photo, Ingrit Valencia, right, of Colombia and Virginia Fuchs, of the United States compete in the women's flyweight boxing final bout at the Pan American Games in Lima, Peru. U.S. Olympic team boxer Fuchs will face no punishment for failing a doping test after the U.S. Anti-Doping Association determined the violation had been caused by two substances transmitted by her boyfriend through sex. USADA announced its ruling Thursday, June 11, 2020, clearing the 32-year-old Fuchs, who intends to qualify for the Tokyo Olympics next year as a flyweight.

U.S. Olympic team boxer Virginia Fuchs will face no punishment for failing a doping test after the U.S. Anti-Doping Association determined the violation had been caused by two substances transmitted by her boyfriend through sex.

USADA announced its ruling Thursday clearing the 32-year-old Fuchs, who intends to qualify for the Tokyo Olympics next year as a flyweight.

Fuchs has served as a recent captain of the U.S. Olympic team, which returned to Colorado Springs this week for its first training camp since the start of the coronavirus pandemic.

Fuchs learned in March that she had tested positive for two banned substances during an out-of-competition test in February. While investigating the tests, USADA learned Fuchs' partner had been taking products that included the two banned substances, and the levels of Fuchs' violations were consistent with recent exposure through sexual transmission.

USADA CEO Travis Tygart said his organization confirmed Fuchs' violation only because it was required to do so.

“While the World Anti-Doping Code requires that this no-fault finding be considered a violation and be publicly announced, we strongly believe this case and others like it, including meat contamination and prescription medication contamination cases, should be considered no violation,” Tygart said. “We will continue to advocate for changes to the World Anti-Doping Code so that where there is no intent to cheat and no performance benefit, an athlete should not face any violation or unnecessary public attention.”

Fuchs didn't immediately return a phone call from The Associated Press. On her Twitter account, she expressed her gratitude to USADA.

“This has been a huge lesson for me and now that (it's) over, I’m fully focused on preparing for Tokyo,” Fuchs wrote.

Fuchs is taking her third shot at an Olympic appearance this year. She was the U.S. team's flyweight before the Rio Olympics in 2016, but fell just short of qualification for the games.

Fuchs and most of her U.S. teammates still must secure a spot in Tokyo in two qualifying tournaments to be held within the next year.

———

More AP sports: https://apnews.com/tag/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP—Sports

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Recommended for you

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.